Posts Tagged With: MWLUG

An apparent theme: application agnosticism

As always, I’m enjoying learning new things and seeing old friends (and some new ones!) at MWLUG. There have been sessions that talked about accessing and displaying data from within Notes without using Notes or XPages and sessions about accessing non-Notes data using XPages. Much of the excitement is about having data exposed via a REST service and using a good front end tool to display it. So, in some senses, we are talking about not needing Notes at all.

Earlier this summer, our company’s Vice President of the Office of Information Management and Technology announced that we’re actually moving away from the Notes client for mail. While I knew that this was a possibility, I’d thought we were still just looking at allowing folks to choose other mail applications to access their mail. Of course, allowing multiple mail applications either tosses some of your users to the wolves of ‘no support’ or complicates things immeasurably for support. So, it does make sense and was not particularly unexpected. Nonetheless, it still surprised me.

The core of our Notes use has always applications anyway. Our business relies on a lot of people working disconnected and, as such, the Notes replication model has been key to our need for Notes. So, we’ll be keeping the Notes client on machines for all those people who work disconnected, but much of our access had already moved to the browser. So, in a sense the work I do was moving in this direction as well.

So, the agnosticism is where we’re all going, it seems. I guess the mantra remains — use the best tool for the job.

Categories: Conferences, General Interest, Xpages | Tags: | Leave a comment

Sessions for #MWLUG2016

Looking over the announced sessions for MWLUG 2016 down in Austin, I’m excited. There’s a good mix of things you can use today and road maps you can apply in the future. I’m a developer, so all the Development and Best Practices sessions look interesting. The tough part will be picking which ones to attend (and record!)

Five sessions that jumped off the page at me are, in no particular order:

Debugging Java In Your Domino Applications with Julian Robichaux — Java just kills me sometimes. Heck, all of XPages does, but learning more about how to debug and troubleshoot is always useful.

Extreme Development: Pair Programming with Devin Olson and Mike McGarel — Now that Elvis Lezcano is aboard at DAI, we might have a chance to do some of this. He’s the smartest developer I’ve worked with, which I why this is the third job we’ve had together.

Think Outside The Box with Karl-Henry Martinsson — We’ve just been breaking into using REST services with jQuery and Bootstrap to present data, so getting someone else’s take on it will expand my ability to combine data from multiple databases to dazzle our users. (see Kathy’s session on dashboards for ideas she’s using for us)

Getting Your Hands on Graphs with Nathan Freeman — I have loved all the conceptual sessions and want to learn more. If Nathan can get me to understand, there’s no telling how far we can go!

A Modernized Developer’s Workflow with Domino/XPages with Eric McCormick — Workflow has always been a great strength of Notes, so getting modernized by someone who’s not spouting theory, but displaying methods in practice is exciting.

Now, before anyone complains about me not mentioning their sessions…. I’d like to sit in on about… 27 sessions. Since Marky has made no progress on the time machine and IBM doesn’t have anyone working replication of people instead of just data and design, I think I only get about a dozen sessions.

Categories: Conferences, Java, Xpages | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Austin, Texas hosts #MWLUG2016 in August

While the definition of “Midwest” may be getting broader, there is no denying the huge value of the largest Notes user conference in the US, MWLUG. This year, we venture to Texas, holding our conference in one of the premier hotels in Austin, while keeping lodging affordable.

We are please to officially announce that MWLUG 2016 will be held on August 17-19, 2016 at the Four Seasons in Austin, Texas. We have secured a special rate for this premier ICS conference. With all the new innovations that IBM and IBM Business Partners are creating with our favorite technologies, we are “Defining the Art of Collaboration” which is our theme for MWLUG 2016.

We are expecting an even greater turnout this year at MWLUG 2016. We are planning many activities and new formats to make this a special event. For attendees that are interesting in coming earlier, we are also working on a special event on Tuesday, August 16, 2016. We will need to determine if there is enough interest before we book this event. More information will be coming soon.

The Four Seasons location in downtown Austin is rated as one of the best hotels in the United States. We have made special arrangements with the Four Seasons for a special discount of $189.00/night for attendees of MWLUG 2016.

If you are interested in being a sponsor of MWLUG 2016, sponsorship will start next week. Stay tuned for announcements.

Ready to share your knowledge and skills, abstract submission for MWLUG 2016 will start on April 15, 2016 so get your ideas ready. As always, we reserve 25% of the speaking slots to new speakers. So don’t be shy.

Registration for MWLUG 2016 will start on May 1, 2016.

MWLUG 2016 session tracks include:

  • Application Development
  • Best Practices in Social Collaboration
  • Customer Business Cases
  • Innovation
  • System Administration

MWLUG 2016 is made possible by the generous MWLUG 2016 sponsors whom not only pay for the majority of the cost for MWLUG 2016, but also donate their time in organizing and providing technical sessions on critical topics that are important to our ICS community.

  • Close to 50 business and technical sessions
  • Breakfast and Lunch for Thursday and Friday
  • Wednesday Evening Showcase Reception that include drinks and hors d’oeuvres
  • Thursday Evening Social Event
  • Networking with your colleagues in the ICS community
  • And a whole lot more

While I will again be videotaping the session I attend (like my videos from MWLUG 2014 and MWLUG 2015) but it’s nothing like seeing it in person. Your session choices might be different from mine and there’s really no substitute for seeing it in person. Additionally, all of us also end up learning from each other in between sessions, over meals and in the evenings. You get to make connections that will be useful when you hit a roadblock or…. when you’re looking for a new job or trying to find a new employee. Since the cost of the conference itself is nominal and lodging is reasonable, I can’t see a reason you wouldn’t attend.

Note that session proposals can be pitched starting April 15th!

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Videotapes of #MWLUG2015

The whirlwind of MWLUG has passed for 2015. It was an outstanding conference, giving me an opportunity to explore a lot of new technologies, to learn some new techniques and to spend time with the peers that I usually only encounter online. I’ve said before, and I’ll say again, the greatest benefit of these conferences is sharing ideas and discussing issues outside the sessions. While you can get a good exposure to the information watching the videos, it’s never as much as you get from everyone being there. Additionally, my video list is subject to my own tastes. As such, it leans heavily toward development. I won’t apologize for that, but encourage anyone else who wants to start videotaping the administration sessions to do so.

I took my trusty video camera along, remembering to pack my best tripod this time. I’m not sure it’s so evident with the 2014 videos, but I’m not a good self-leveling cameraman. My Sunpak 70″ Ultra 7000TM Tripod has two bubble-levels and rises above the crowd, even when they’re standing. This is most helpful when I’m at the back of a big room and people need to walk in front of the camera. It probably also helps a little in assuring a better angle for the footage – nothing worse than staring up at the speaker. My Canon DM-50 Directional Stereo Microphone might actually be the coolest piece of equipment in the bundle (the Canon HG10 AVCHD video camera is old, but not cheap) and having found the back cover, it worked like a champ in Atlanta. The vaulted ceilings in Grand Rapids last year may have hindered the quality of the sound, but missing the cover couldn’t have helped. I might look at adding wireless microphones or getting some lights, since I know I can improve the image and sound quality further, though I be better served by buying some books and getting a steadier hand! Checking a few videos, I know I need more attention to lighting for certain, if not actual lights of my own.

The important thing today is to share our whole suite of videos from the conference. You could jump right to the entire MWLUG playlist, which includes some sessions from 2014, or use the chronological list here:

Wednesday sessions

CS101: Entrepreneurs Roundtable – What “They” Never Tell You About Owning a Business panel moderated by Lisa Duke
BP103: Let the Phoenix Rise: Rationalise your IBM Domino environment by Arshad Khalid and Stephanie Heit
AD108: Move Your XPages to the Fast Lane by Howard Greenberg

Opening General Session
“Everything Starts From A Dot”: The Elements and Principles of Design as the Visual Link to Innovation by Katherine Rhodes Fields
Establishing a New Culture of Design by Adam Cutler
IBM ESS Strategy Roadmap and Radar: A New Way to Work by Kramer Reeves and Peter Janzen

Thursday sessions

AD109: Navigating the Jungle of Modern Web Development by Shean McManus
The Greater Good of Social Collaboration by Louis Richardson
AD101: App.Next: The Future of Domino Application Development by Pete Janzen
AD107: Maven: An Exhortation and Apology by Jesse Gallagher
IV102: Graphs in Action by Nathan T Freeman

Friday sessions

AD117: Web Sockets – “Pushing” the web forward by Mark Roden
AD106: Just a View: An Introduction To Model-View-Controller Pattern by Ulrich Krause
AD114:Take Your XPages Development to the Next Level by Brad Balassaitis and Paul Calhoun
AD112: Real World Experience: Integrating DB2 with XPages by Steve Zavocki and Dwain Wuerfel
AD101: Design Matters by Keith Strickland and Bob Kadrie

All 16 videos published within a week. Last Wednesday at this time, Howard was wrapping up his session so that we could head down to the Exhibitors’ Showcase Reception. While all of these have gone out on twitter, there will be more postings and linkings to come. I think most of the slide decks are on people’s sites and some them have linked directly to the videos already. So, almost all of the 2015 work is done.

Spoke to my boss about MWLUG 2016 in Austin and she’s all in favor of it. Looking forward to seeing 250 of you there and many more of you in Orlando at the end of January. Now, if I can just get some work done on a session for Connect by the end of next week, I’ll be golden!

Categories: Conferences, Videos | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

What “They” Never Tell You About Owning a Business #MWLUG2015

Just over six years ago, my lovely and talented wife, Melissa Henderson left behind her employers and struck out on her own. Well, not alone. She brought along Joy Ruffin, who’d moved with her from Russell Reynolds to Gilbert Tweed. Oh, and she brought me, though I kept my day job. While our friend Joy isn’t with the company any more, it has grown far beyond using a spare bedroom as corporate headquarters. There have been a lot of lessons along the way, so when Lisa Duke’s session for MWLUG 2015 was announced, I put Melissa in touch with her. Melissa often travels with me to my conferences (and I sometimes to hers, since both of us can work from anywhere), so it seemed a perfect fit. Now, my wife will be on a panel at a technical conference before I’ve done it myself!

CS101: Entrepreneur’s Roundtable: What “They” Never Tell You About Owning a Business
Have you ever considered going out on your own as a consultant (or worry that one day your company may “liberate” you and you may need to contract between permanent jobs)? What are the common pitfalls to avoid? What’s involved? And with all that, what perks are there to make it worthwhile? Join the discussion from seasoned small business owners both inside and outside the IT world to share your experiences and learn from others.

I’m very much looking forward to the session, not just to see her speak (and videotape it, as I do several sessions at each MWLUG), but to hear the experience of the other entrepreneurs. As the spouse and sounding board for her, it will really help me her her in the future.

So, if you enjoy the session, make sure to introduce yourself and feel free to buy her a glass of French wine!

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Mastering #XPages: Buy the eBook

I’ve had my copy of Mastering XPages (2nd Edition) for a little while. It’s a darn heavy book, but because of that, it’s packed with information. More packed that the 1st Edition? Why, yes, yes it is. Mine is in hard cover and the 1100-plus pages is a little bit daunting to carry around. Nonetheless, there is nothing quite like it.

I’ve always been a guy who learns well from physical books. I like the feel of them. I like the structured approach to learning that they provide. The code examples in the text, along with great images, really provide a lot on insight to what you can do with XPages. I’d say it compares well with reading a variety of blogs because of the depth and structure provided. I can and do read dozens of blogs, but they don’t have any comprehensive structure. For example, I write mostly about the problems that I’ve encountered coding in XPages. While that might teach you a lot about XPages, it’s got no structure at all. If you read Marky’s blog, you’ll learn a lot, and often in a structured manner about the topic he’s dealing with, but it won’t take you from ground zero to XPages developer. Similarly, the extensive XPages library over at Notes in 9 is fantastic (and you ought to be watching all of those videos), but there’s not necessarily a comprehensive plan, nor a logical learning order. I love Paul Della-Nebbia’s video series, Intro to XPages, as it’s a great place to start learning, but you won’t get 21 chapters of knowledge there.

Now, before you start thinking it’s a massive slog of text with only hard-copy code samples, brace yourself. Just like the blogs noted above, you can download sample applications that go along with the examples in the book to help you learn all aspects of XPages.

In the months I’ve owned it, I’ve read several chapters straight through, used one chapter (18 – Internationalization) to add a huge capability to our applications with a mere hour of research and searched through the massive text for little bits and pieces.

This brings me to the electronic version. I’m old. I’ve admitted above to loving books. As I was pondering my review, I thought I needed to try the electronic version. So, using the code supplied in the hard-copy of the book, I added the electronic version to my tablet (Motorola Xoom that’s getting a bit long-in-the-tooth). I searched a little, which definitely beats the heck out of the hard copy’s index, since you can not only find more, but also jump directly to that spot in the text. I sat and read a little — I’ve already established that I’m willing to read books on it with military history — and it’s very nice. When you get into books over a thousand pages, it’s so much easier to tote around an electronic copy in your backpack, or read on the Metro, or pluck it out of your carry-on while flying to MWLUG. I highly recommend the electronic version. Depending on finances, I might not worry about the hard copy next time and simply get my hands on the e-book.

This edition adds in various changes from the release of the 1st edition — over 3 years of changes. It’s written in the irrepressible style that won Marky’s approval. It’s a jam-packed learning experience. If you don’t have it already, do yourself a favor and get a copy today. Try the electronic version. You’ll thank me.

Categories: Xpages | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Why our guest speaker matters at #MWLUG

As are many others, I’m preparing myself for next week’s MWLUG. However, since I’m not a speaker yet, much of my preparation involves being ready to ask good questions — and helping others do the same. In particular, I have a background in military history that matches very well with our guest speaker, Virgil Westdale.

As some of you know, I blog about military history, with emphasis on World War II. I’ve spoken at some conferences about the role of the 36th Infantry Division in the invasion of southern France (Operation Dragoon) and the fighting in the Vosges Mountains (preceding the Battle of the Colmar Pocket). Mr. Westdale served with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team in WWII and they were ‘attached’ to the 36th Infantry Division during that fighting in the Vosges Mountains.

What’s a Regiment and what’s a Division?

One of the challenges when talking about military history is the terminology. Most people have heard of Divisions and are likely familiar with a few (101st Airborne Division, known as the ‘Screaming Eagles’, or the 1st Infantry Division, known as ‘The Big Red One’). Divisions are large with around 15,000 men being a common size for American Divisions in WWII. A Division was usually comprised of 3 Regiments and assorted other units, some ‘organic’ and some ‘attached’. Organic elements are those units that are a normal part of the larger unit, while attached elements are those assigned on a temporary basis.

Among the units that would be organic or attached to a Division would be infantry, artillery, armored (tanks), engineers, medical units, and various logistical elements. Normally, units smaller than a Division didn’t get different types of units assigned to them. However, a Regimental Combat Team was different. Like a Division, the RCT could have those other units assigned to it. That way, the RCT could fight as a separate unit, with its own ‘organic’ anti-tank, artillery and engineering units. The Army didn’t have a lot of RCTs, since they preferred to do things on a Divisional scale.

The pain of attached units

Any time that a unit was attached temporarily to a larger unit, it tended to suffer worse than the organic units. That is, if I had three Regiments and got another temporarily, I would probably use that temporarily attached one more vigorously. As a Divisional commander, you’d know each of Regiments and likely be concerned about their welfare. The attached unit wouldn’t be one familiar to you, so you wouldn’t have the empathy for them — and if they were joining you while you were already fighting, they’d be ‘fresh’ and more able to cope with the stress of combat.

Thus, every separate Regiment or Regimental Combat Team, and certainly every separate Battalion, was over-used in combat. Imagine if you’re hiring a developer to simply help you out with a single project. Aren’t you going to be less concerned with their growth and happiness, while being far more concerned with results? Might you drive them a little harder because you see every nickel that goes to support them?

Was the 442nd unique?

Even for a Regimental Combat Team, the 442nd was unique. It faced higher challenges, was treated even worse than most ‘attached’ units and still managed to outperform every expectation.

It was formed of Japanese-Americans, many of them from Hawaii. About 1300 Japanese-Americans serving in the Hawaiian National Guard formed the basis for the 100th Infantry Battalion, which was the core of what became of the 442nd. Japanese-Americans (Nisei) on the mainland of the US were interned in camps during the war in one of the more racist actions taken by our government. Despite this, many of the young men from the camps chose to enlist in the Army.

Since it was a racially segregated unit, that meant that it could only get replacements who were also Nisei. This was a terrible problem since the recruits bound for the 442nd were only for the 442nd and couldn’t just be taken from any replacement depot. This meant that they rarely got any replacements except when they were in rear areas. So, if the 442nd was in combat for a month or two, its numbers would dwindle each day. That was very uncommon. While replacements didn’t refill any unit in the line, there was usually a steady stream of both new and experienced men (when a wounded soldier healed, he might end up in a different unit).

The Nisei soldiers quickly earned a reputation for fierceness in combat and dedication to duty. This was a double-edged sword. They earned high praise for their efforts, but it also meant they ended up with the toughest assignments. What’s worse is that since they were not with one specific Division, they could end up with the toughest assignments from anywhere within the European Theater of Operations. With no high-ranking officer being concerned for their welfare, they had to fend for themselves.

What happened in the Vosges?

One of the 442nd many tough assignments was in the Vosges Mountains. The 36th Infantry Division was fighting through the mountains, trying to reach Alsace. Many people think of the campaign up from southern France as the ‘Champagne Campaign’, as though the Germans simply turned and ran back to Germany. They didn’t. When the positions they held were untenable, they would fall back to the next easily defended position. The Vosges Mountains were not only good defensive ground, but they protected the Alsace region — which the Germans thought of as part of Germany. So, they had great ground and they were no longer simply delaying.

Unfortunately, the Allied command thought they could just push through, so continuous attack was the order of the day for months. General Dahlquist, who commanded the 36th Infantry Division, was incessant in his requests for more troops. So, they sent him the 442nd. I think the assessment of how the 442nd was used by Dahlquist is that it was almost criminally negligent. They were pushed to the limit and used in some assaults that were over open ground which ought to have been avoided.

Near the end of their stay with the 36th, one of Dahlquist’s battalions was pushed too far forward down a ridgeline and the Germans crept in from either side to cut them off. Thus, the 1st Battalion of the 141st Regiment became a ‘lost battalion’. Needless to say, the Nisei were tasked with breaking through enemy lines to rescue them. In the end, the rescue resulted in as many casualties for the 442nd as the number of men it rescued.

Over the five weeks that 442nd was attached to the 36th, they suffered 80% casualties. Yes, 4 out of 5 men in the unit was killed, wounded or missing at the end of the 5 weeks. After they were pulled out of the line at the end of their attachment, Dahlquist asked for them to gather on a parade field to be reviewed. When he saw the small number of men, he was livid. He had ordered that every man be on the parade field. Every single one who could walk was there. Their bodies and uniforms were broken, but not their spirit. It’s said that when Dahlquist realized what had happened, tears filled his eyes, but the damage was done. He’d abused them and threw a tantrum when they presented themselves.

So why does this matter?

Virgil Westdale went through one heck of tough time in the war and we’re only dealing with one small aspect in what I’ve written above. He also faced many other challenges throughout his life, yet achieved great things. I suspect that the lessons he learned about leadership and perseverance are ones we would all do well to learn.

Of course, there may be some object lessons about managing developers or about having champions right in the midst of the story…. What do you see in what you’ve read that you might use? Or what might you want to ask Mr Westdale about at MWLUG?

Categories: Conferences | Tags: , , | 1 Comment

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